Tuinmaak

Mail order bare root fruit trees

Mail order bare root fruit trees



We are searching data for your request:

Forums and discussions:
Manuals and reference books:
Data from registers:
Wait the end of the search in all databases.
Upon completion, a link will appear to access the found materials.

Mail order bare root fruit trees

I live in South Florida where it has gotten extremely hot in the summer and cold in the winter, so I have a pretty big problem with bare trees. My tree nursery supplies trees that are bare root and are supposed to be in a special medium to grow well, but in this heat and cold, they don't and they die. What are some of the options available to grow trees in this type of situation?

I heard of a grower somewhere that grows trees in the winter but I'm having trouble locating this information. Is it possible to get trees grown in containers like a planter where the roots are just left in water in a place like your home with this heat and cold? Would the roots develop properly?

As far as growing, what trees are the best for the Florida climate? I love the idea of figs and pomegranates.

If you live in the South you can get fruit trees to grow from seed, the trees are bare-root and are supposed to be very hardy in that environment. But if you're just looking to grow a bunch of trees from seed, I'd suggest something that's deciduous in that you can get a tree that sheds leaves in the summer, as that's when the fruit is ready. Something like apple, pear, apricot, cherry, peach, nectarine or plum.

As far as growing them, I'd say they're easiest to grow in a container, but they can be grown outside too if you have a really big area and they need it.

In Florida in the summer, it's too hot for apples. Figs are a better choice. We get really hot, sticky summers as well, and can get 100+ days. Pomegranates are best here, but even that has its problems. The fruit is fine, but the tree itself does not take as well.

If you live in Florida you can get fruit trees to grow from seed, the trees are bare-root and are supposed to be very hardy in that environment. But if you're just looking to grow a bunch of trees from seed, I'd suggest something that's deciduous in that you can get a tree that sheds leaves in the summer, as that's when the fruit is ready. Something like apple, pear, apricot, cherry, peach, nectarine or plum.

As far as growing them, I'd say they're easiest to grow in a container, but they can be grown outside too if you have a really big area and they need it.

I live in Florida and I want to grow fruit trees. I can only find information about citrus trees. I live in Miami, Florida and know that the best fruit to grow is mango, but I don't want to go out of town to grow them. Do you know of any fruit trees that grow well in South Florida?

I had a neighbor back in the day that raised some beautiful Pears from seed. You could find out if the farmer in your area is willing to sell the fruit, it was always ready to pick.

But if you want to raise your own, go for it. Pears grow real fast and are very easy to grow. They can be pruned any time and don't have any issues getting sun either. I remember reading the name of the company that sells Pear trees but I forgot. I'll look for it tomorrow and post it. It was on the first page of my search so I'll give you the link.

Pears are very hardy and I'm fairly sure that the soil is the big problem with it. We live in the south central part of Florida and it's hot, humid and not much dirt. We have good luck with apples and cherries though.

Just to be safe if you're interested I'd make sure that it's not over your head. Have you thought about putting it in a pot first and transplanting later? They can be started from a seed in pots. Sterkte

It would be nice to have mangoes all year round. I would love to be able to do this. I have a big mango tree in my yard but it only gets little pickings. However, I do have a bunch of orange trees growing very well right now.

I've also heard of a man that grows apples, cherries, and peaches on his property. His house is about 15 miles from where I live. He started out with a few peaches and then eventually added some apple trees and then cherry trees. He says that there is enough rainfall in this area that fruit trees don't really need a lot of water.

The first year was a real struggle. He had a total of 8 trees. They were small, but they grew into trees that are huge now. I've seen pictures of the tree that he had originally and it's so huge.

I am very interested in a tree that can grow mangoes and the ability to grow them year around.

Thanks for sharing the website. Ek waardeer dit regtig. I remember reading the name of the company that sells Pear trees but I forgot. I'll look for it tomorrow and post it. It was on the first page of my search so I'll give you the link.

Pere is baie gehard en ek is redelik seker dat die grond die groot ding is om van te weet. Hierdie plek hier in so Cal het baie goeie groeitoestande met baie reën. Maar ek het gehoor dat bome in ander gebiede 'n bietjie somerhitte benodig, so ek is nie seker nie. Ek sal nie verbaas wees as daar peerkwekers in Texas of êrens anders is nie, net nie noodwendig in so Cal nie. Maar ja, die klimaat is baie anders. Ek dink dat die ander ding om na te kyk, die hoeveelheid sonlig is wat u area kry.

Ek hoop dat jou mango -boom groot en sterk word. Ek sou probeer om die een wat u hierdie somer in u tuin het, te plant (as u nie omgee vir die gemors nie) en kyk of dit goed groei in u omgewing. Vanjaar se mango -gewas is nie altyd groot nie. Ek het 'n paar verskillende variëteite probeer wat redelik goeie sukses gehad het, en ek dink dat verskeidenheid seleksie 'n groot verskil kan maak. As die boom nie goed vaar nie, sal dit waarskynlik help om dit onder 'n mangoboom in die grond te plant om te sien of dit